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Abdominal Pain Management

Abdominal pain is defined as pain occurring in the belly between the chest and groin. Abdominal pain is one of the more common medical complaints and is usually self-limited and resolves without treatment. When abdominal pain is severe, persistent or disabling, medical evaluation from an abdominal pain management clinic specialist is recommended for abdominal pain relief.

Causes of Abdominal Pain

There are many potential causes of abdominal pain, including but not limited to ulcers, hernias, endometriosis in women, Crohn's disease and appendicitis. Patients experiencing abdominal pain associated with fever, vomiting or painful urination should seek medical care from a pain management clinic specialist. As with any other type of pain, abdominal pain is considered chronic when it has lasted for at least six months.

Preparing for Your Abdominal Pain Specialist Appointment

Before your abdominal pain management appointment with your clinic doctor or abdominal pain specialist, take note of some important fact, which can help your pain specialist with your abdominal pain relief.

  • Is your abdominal pain the result of an injury?
  • What movements increase or decrease your abdominal pain?
  • What are the abdominal pain symptoms you have been feeling?
  • How long have you had this abdominal pain?
  • What does your abdominal pain feel like?
  • What type of work do you do?
  • What treatments or medications have you already tried for abdominal pain relief?

Treatment Options for Abdominal Pain Relief

At MAPS, we evaluate abdominal pain patients by gathering their medical history, performing a physical examination and reviewing medical records. There are a number of abdominal pain management and abdominal pain relief treatment options, including:

 

                                                                                                                                   

Last reviewed March 2014 by the MAPS Internal Medical Review Committee.